Remote Instruction vs Online Learning

Remote Instruction vs Online Teaching and Learning

There are considerable differences between remote instruction and online teaching and learning, though overlap does exist. For example, both might include a blend of synchronous and asynchronous interactions. Here is a quick way to think of the two versions of instruction at a distance.

Remote Instruction: Moving content designed for face-to-face instruction online for limited or one-time-only course instruction.

Online Teaching and Learning: The purposeful design and implementation of an online course to support online teaching and learning. Courses are designed and facilitated according to best practices for online teaching and learning.

In light of the unique circumstance surrounding Spring 2020, we are encouraging faculty who have not previously taught an online course to move towards remote instruction for Spring 2020. Stanford's (2020) "Bandwidth Immediacy Matrix" asks instructors to consider how connectivity and responsiveness factor into the remote learning experiences.  

Trying to decide where to start? Please review the remote instruction readiness checklist as you prepare for your Spring teaching responsibilities. Kory Ching (UWP) outlined some of these points in the Emergency Remote Writing Instruction list (see sidebar). 

Remote Instruction Readiness Checklist

Assessing your readiness for remote instruction can inform what you need to prioritize as you prepare to teach at a distance.

  • Technical Skills 
  • Statement Yes No
    I can use document and spreadsheet tools (e.g., Google Docs, Word, Exel, PowerPoint, Google Slides).    
    I can perform basic file management tasks on my computer, such as copying, moving, renaming, and deleting files or folders.    
    I can send and receive emails, and open and send email attachments.    
    I can use an Internet browser, such as Google Chrome, Firefox, or Safari, to search the Web.    
    I can use an Internet browser, such as Google Chrome, Firefox, or Safari, to upload/download files and programs.    

    Answer mostly yes? Congratulations! You have demonstrated the technical skills needed to support remote instruction. See (forthcoming) for additional tips and strategies for maximizing your effectiveness and student learning.

    Answer mostly no? Don’t worry, here are a few resources that may help you further your technical skills: The Tools for Remote Teaching site has resources and contact information for individual help. We also encourage you to review (forthcoming resource) for tips and strategies to maximize your effectiveness and student learning.

  • Teaching Technology Experience
  • Statement Yes No
    I am comfortable using built-in Canvas tools (e.g., modules, pages, assignments, discussion boards) to support course instruction.    
    I am comfortable using Canvas assessment tools to evaluate student performance.    
    I am comfortable using Canvas Grades to record student grades.    
    I am comfortable using Canvas Collaborations, Google Docs, and/or other digital tools to support collaboration between students.    
    I am comfortable using Zoom video-conferencing to support instruction.    
    I am comfortable using Canvas Announcements, Inbox, and/or Chat to exchange messages to students.    
    I'm comfortable using media tools (e.g. Aggie Video) to record and/or share videos with my students.    

    Answer mostly yes? Congratulations! Your Technology Teaching Experience demonstrates a readiness to support remote instruction. See (forthcoming resource) for additional tips and strategies for maximizing your effectiveness and student learning using Canvas.

    Answer mostly no? Don’t worry, we are in this together. Here are a few resources that may help you further your Technology Teaching Experience : https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/tools-remote-instruction. We also encourage you to review (forthcoming resource) for tips and strategies to maximize your effectiveness and student learning. Have additional questions? Contact: trainers@ucdavis.edu.

  • Course Design
  • Statement Yes No
    I understand the basic principles of integrated course design.    
    I feel comfortable writing measurable learning objectives based on Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy.    
    I feel comfortable designing active learning activities that provide students opportunities to interact with their peers, their instructor, and course content remotely.    
    I understand copyright law and Fair Use guidelines when using copyrighted materials.    
    I understand accessibility policies and know how to accommodate student needs.    

    Answer mostly yes? Congratulations! Your knowledge and skills demonstrate a readiness to support remote instruction. See (forthcoming resource) for additional tips and strategies for maximizing your effectiveness and student learning. Copyright and Fair Use guidelines from UC Davis Libraries: https://www.library.ucdavis.edu/service/scholarly-communications/copyright-and-licensing/#using-copyright-work-2

    Answer mostly no? Don’t worry, we are in this together. Here are a few resources that may help you further your course design skills and knowledge: (forthcoming resource). We also encourage you to review (forthcoming resource) for tips and strategies to maximize your effectiveness and student learning. Have additional questions? If you have questions about accessibility, contact Joshua Hori in the Student Disability Center: jhori@ucdavis.edu. Contact: cee@ucdavis.edu to schedule an individualized consultation about teaching strategies.

  • Course Planning and Management
  • Statement Yes No
    My student evaluations of teaching consistently agree or strongly agree that my course materials are organized.    
    I understand the importance of providing timely and constructive feedback on student performance.    
    I am committed to student learning and will do my best to support student learning as best I can.    

    Answer mostly yes? Congratulations! Your skills and dispositions demonstrate a readiness to support remote instruction. See (forthcoming resource) for additional tips and strategies for maximizing your effectiveness and student learning.

    Answer mostly no? Don’t worry, we are in this together. Here are a few resources that may help you further your planning and management skills: (forthcoming resource). We also encourage you to review (forthcoming resource) for tips and strategies to maximize your effectiveness and student learning. Have additional questions? Contact: cee@ucdavis.edu to schedule an individualized consultation.

    This resource was modified from: https://www.utdl.edu/lv/assessments/faculty_readiness.html